A discussion on many cultural traditions in claudia kolkers the immigrant advantage

One notable example of how the author presented a more complete story of how immigrants adapted the same cultural practice was in Chapter 2 about mothering the mother.

If someone steals or cheats, that money is gone with no recourse. I purchased this book with higher expectations, wanting more critical analysis and less eager appropriation of other cultures' traditions.

the immigrant advantage claudia kolker pdf

These are trends which have been changing for a while, just as mainstream Caucasian marital patterns are trending towards later age in marriage late 20s to mid 30s.

While the author's effort to illustrate each chapter with real-life stories is commendable, in several chapters it it bordered on making one-sided generalizations which do not depict a complete story of how immigrants who have settled in different parts of the same host country USA may attempt to continue the same cultural practices.

But the author goes on to blithely narrate how she managed to arrange such an experience for herself after the birth of her children.

I felt that much of her storytelling in later chapters w I really enjoyed certain chapters of this book: namely Chapters 1, 2, 4, and 8. Perhaps this treatment is different because it is the focus of a final wrap-up chapter as well as the standard chapter devoted to each other concept. Aug 04, Ashley rated it liked it I wavered between three and four stars as I rated this book. Instead of echoing those who call for complete assimilation to life in the US, Kolker, a former international journalist and the daughter of an immigrant, has developed an appreciation of different cultures and their ability to adapt social traditions which help their members thrive—not only in their home countries but also as immigrants living in the United States. For example, the chapter about tak I wavered between three and four stars as I rated this book. By contrast, the immigrant communities Kolker interviewed acknowledge both the above needs and the fact that they are challenging—too challenging for one person to tackle without support from family or community. For example, the chapter about taking care of new mothers after childbirth does acknowledge that most American women do not have the type of familial or friend-based support system in place to experience anything like the day Mexican cuarentena. It would be nice if these were add-on benefits rather Enjoyed the contents. For instance, when the author contacted her own social network, trying to "assist" a friend's search for a partner, she received almost no responses. The chutzpah to go, as a single woman, anywhere that I pleased. If the premise of Kolker's book that US citizens can learn from immigrants is essentially positive, she may underestimate how difficult it is to put into practice. I felt that much of her storytelling in later chapters w I really enjoyed certain chapters of this book: namely Chapters 1, 2, 4, and 8. However, I ultimately feel the book is too intellectually shallow to warrant a rating higher than three stars. Especially right now.

However, in a time when immigrants are stereotyped as needy, culturally deficient foreigners running to the United States for handouts, the message of her book is refreshing. Kolker must be a really interesting person and this comes across straight away in her writing.

I would absolutely advocate this fairly quick, simple read for anyone interested in examining how other people live and picking up a few life tips along the way.

the immigrant advantage summary

The final chapter is a strong ending only because it is a continuation of the hui story begun in Chapter She starts with a Vietnamese tradition called a hui pronounced hoia money-club that provides both an alternative to costly loans and a social incentive to save money.

Final verdict is that The Immigrant Advantage is a good read, with a strong start that looses steam about half-way through.

She has also managed to pick 8 very varied cultural ideas, including money clubs, the cuarantena quarantine applied to new mothers, com thang a sort of communal meals-on-wheels business , the benefits of front-stoop-perching — really something from every aspect of life. I loved it. While the author's effort to illustrate each chapter with real-life stories is commendable, in several chapters it it bordered on making one-sided generalizations which do not depict a complete story of how immigrants who have settled in different parts of the same host country USA may attempt to continue the same cultural practices. But the author goes on to blithely narrate how she managed to arrange such an experience for herself after the birth of her children. I would absolutely advocate this fairly quick, simple read for anyone interested in examining how other people live and picking up a few life tips along the way. It would be nice if these were add-on benefits rather Enjoyed the contents. The final chapter is a strong ending only because it is a continuation of the hui story begun in Chapter Kolker must be a really interesting person and this comes across straight away in her writing. Kolker also looks at Mexican and Mexican-American neighborliness and the Vietnamese custom of contracting out for "monthly rice," a cheap but healthy home-cooked meal. In arguing her thesis, Kolker also places too much emphasis on the "usefulness" of traditions, rather than admiring cultural practices for their own sakes. For example, the chapter about tak I wavered between three and four stars as I rated this book. She has also managed to pick 8 very varied cultural ideas, including money clubs, the cuarantena quarantine applied to new mothers, com thang a sort of communal meals-on-wheels business , the benefits of front-stoop-perching — really something from every aspect of life. However, in a time when immigrants are stereotyped as needy, culturally deficient foreigners running to the United States for handouts, the message of her book is refreshing. The traditions she does not directly apply to her own life, such as multigenerational living spaces, are nevertheless lauded more than critically examined.
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The Immigrant Advantage By Claudia Kolker